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Review of: Vox Good Doctor

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Vox Good Doctor

The Good Doctor. Von links: Dr. Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore), unbekannter Darsteller und Dr. Alex Park (Will Yun Lee) Die Verwendung des. Dr. Morgan Reznick (Fiona Gubelmann, l.) und Caroline Reznik (Annette O'Toole​) Die Verwendung des sendungsbezogenen Materials ist nur. Die Serie The Good Doctor (tvnow) streamen ▷ Viele weitere Serien-Episoden aus dem Genre Drama im Online Stream bei TVNOW anschauen.

Vox Good Doctor "The Good Doctor" bei TVNOW: Alle Folgen online schauen

The Good Doctor: Anders zu sein, macht manchmal den Unterschied – das weiß auch Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore). "The Good Doctor" bei VOX. In der 18 Folgen umfassenden ersten Staffel der ABC-Serie "The Good Doctor" nach dem Drehbuch von "Dr. House"-Schöpfer David. Ganze Folgen von "The Good Doctor" und den VOX-Live-Stream sehen Sie online bei summa11.eu und in der TV NOW App. Terminplaner für alle VOX-Sendetermine im Fernsehen: · Mi DVD-News​: The Good Doctor - Staffel 3 (5 DVDs) erscheint am , hier bestellen. Die Serie The Good Doctor (tvnow) streamen ▷ Viele weitere Serien-Episoden aus dem Genre Drama im Online Stream bei TVNOW anschauen. Dr. Morgan Reznick (Fiona Gubelmann, l.) und Caroline Reznik (Annette O'Toole​) Die Verwendung des sendungsbezogenen Materials ist nur. The Good Doctor. Von links: Dr. Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore), unbekannter Darsteller und Dr. Alex Park (Will Yun Lee) Die Verwendung des.

Vox Good Doctor

Terminplaner für alle VOX-Sendetermine im Fernsehen: · Mi DVD-News​: The Good Doctor - Staffel 3 (5 DVDs) erscheint am , hier bestellen. The Good Doctor: Anders zu sein, macht manchmal den Unterschied – das weiß auch Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore). Dr. Morgan Reznick (Fiona Gubelmann, l.) und Caroline Reznik (Annette O'Toole​) Die Verwendung des sendungsbezogenen Materials ist nur. Vox Good Doctor

Vox Good Doctor - The Good Doctor auf DVD

Neue Arztserie. Kann Shaun mit seinen sozialen Einschränkungen und ohne jegliche Empathie als Arzt wirklich Leben retten? Aaron Glassman. Shaun Freddie Highmore hat allen Grund, nervös zu sein. Mehr Themen und Infos. The Good Doctor. Bonaventure Hospital sind zwei Männer zur Behandlung, für Köln 50667 Nude es keine medizinische Standardtherapie gibt. Viele im St. Hill Harper spielt Dr. Shaun hofft, dass die eifersüchtige Dr. Freddie Highmore spielt Dr.

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The Good Doctor - Ab dem 10.10.18 bei VOX und jetzt schon bei TV NOW Vox Good Doctor

Get it? The character is known only as "the Doctor," and thus, the title of the show is a question: Doctor Who?! But nobody really has asked that question since, like, season one of the show, so you'd be forgiven for thinking this an elaborate, medical-themed riff on the "Who's on First" routine.

He's a time-traveling alien from the planet Gallifrey. It should be able to assume any form but somehow broke and got stuck on the police box.

The TARDIS is larger on the inside than it appears to be on the outside, and it's the greatest vehicle known to man or alien. He's also been played by other actors in other instances, but let's not wander too far into the weeds here.

This was known as the Doctor's "regeneration. Generally, the Doctor and a human companion at present, Jenna Coleman's Clara fly around the universe, having sci-fi adventures.

Different writers on the show like different things, some enjoying epic science-fiction, with others liking to explore the show's roots as a children's educational program.

The Doctor was a time traveler so he could show kids earlier eras. Current showrunner Steven Moffat loves complicated puzzles, and his seasons have been filled with intricate structures that reveal themselves at the last possible moment.

Then the Doctor points his sonic screwdriver at something. Moffat loves the idea of the Doctor as the smartest, cleverest being who ever has lived, and his seasons of the show reflect that idea.

The puzzles can be fun, but his seasons can occasionally feel like he's pushing the characters around on a giant board to achieve his various ends.

Moffat's predecessor, Russell T. Davies , was fond of big, emotional gestures, and that meant he would conclude episodes or seasons with moments when, say, everybody resurrected the Doctor just by believing in him.

Every writer makes his or her mark on the show and the character, which only adds to the series' popularity.

The endless malleability is part of the appeal. It's definitely the sort of show that can be hard to explain without making it sound silly.

Doctor Who started as a series for kids, and it has kept at least one toe in that world ever since. What keeps the series from going too far over the top is that it always commits to what it's trying to do.

It might be doing something unbelievably corny, but everybody involved really cares about the situations and characters on screen.

It helps that the Doctor is such an institution that every actor who plays the role brings prior associations with the character to their portrayal.

But the show also isn't hokey, ultimately, because it carries with it the ultimate blank canvas. The potential for the show's setting is limitless, which is what makes it so enduring.

Matt Smith's Eleventh Doctor center and his companions face down the Daleks in an earlier episode. BBC America. Watching Capaldi yell at Daleks is a highlight of his tenure.

Probably the most beloved Doctor — and certainly the longest-running — is Tom Baker, who played the Fourth Doctor and wore a fancy scarf.

But nearly every Doctor has his adherents. Since the series was revived in , all three actors who have regularly played the Doctor — Christopher Eccleston , David Tennant , and Matt Smith — have their fans.

Matt Smith left and David Tennant teamed up for the 50th anniversary special. No, and every new Doctor that's revealed to be a white dude prompts greater and greater irritation with this fact.

Moffat's a sterling storyteller, and his seasons have ingenious clockwork structures that the Doctor has to deduce.

But this means that for the most part, his female characters usually the companions, but also River Song, a love interest for the Doctor are reduced from human beings who drive the story forward to plot devices the Doctor has to figure out.

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Vanity Fair press. Feels like a more tender, earnest version of House. The New York Times press. But what annoyed me the most was the more or less subtle sexism towards men.

Hey, I totally understand that one would start to despise the other gender if it was the reason for why you're being oppressed and not allowed to talk or work.

But that wasn't the case here. It were more things like "he's not a real man because he wouldn't beat up someone for spitting on his car" or "All boys like to blow things up" Wtf?

Which is something they should do, because it's bullshit!! Double standards are really stupid. Please stop.

How weird is that in a book with this topic? View all 80 comments. Apr 04, Miranda Reads rated it it was amazing Shelves: berkleypub , received-to-review , abc-reading-challenge , dystopian-us.

You're getting hysterical about it. My heart and soul are just dangling by a thread. Honestly, I have not been this angered and wonderfully angered in a long, long time.

Think about what you need to do to stay free. Denial, deliberation and the decisive moment: three response stages to any impending disaster.

Rush through the first two and "Honestly, Jacko. Rush through the first two and act as soon as you can. That's how you hold out. That's how you live.

Jean McClellan, an American linguistic scientist and mother of four, saw all the signs - women representation decreasing in the government, the resurgence of the "pure" religion, the slow chipping away at female freedoms - yet she did nothing.

No goddamned idea. We're on a slippery slide to prehistory girls. Think about it Think about words like 'spousal permission' and 'paternal consent. Then, she found herself without a voice at all.

Courtesy of the "Pure" religious movement - all women were fitted with a little "bracelet" which functioned as a word counter. Every day they received words and severe consequences followed every infraction.

Jean, as linguistic specialist, knows better than anyone what will happen if a child is denied language or an adult is forced to stifle all forms of communication.

But without a voice for herself, how can she even begin? I read every last word in a single sitting. If you thought the The Handmaid's Tale was great - you need to check out this modern upheaval.

This is the kind of book where you literally feel the tension - my heart was pounding, my eyes blurred, I turned the pages so fast that I felt a slight breeze.

Oh the many shivers. With many, many thanks to Berkley Publishing and the Christina Dalcher for sending me a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

All quotes are from an uncorrected proof and are subject to change upon publishing. Blog Instagram Twitter View all 60 comments.

May 31, Will Byrnes rated it really liked it Shelves: feminist-dystopian-and-not , science-fiction , fiction , satire. Easily, I think, and push out of my chair.

Words matter. If your ideal of womanhood tends toward the Stepford-ish , Vox will present an image of paradise. For the rest of us, it offers a dark vision of a possible future in which the lines between religion of the extremist, fundamentalist sort, and government are not just blurred, but erased.

See Taliban, ISIS, or any of many Christian sects that insist that civil law should be based on the Bible God knows there are plenty of places in the USA where a large number of folks would be just fine with that, as long as it is the proper religion.

Well, probably not the majority of the women. A deranged leader had let power go to his head and decided to shake things up.

From this day on, the official language of San Marcos will be Swedish. In addition to that, all citizens will be required to change their underwear every half-hour.

Underwear will be worn on the outside so we can check. There are different lunatics in charge in Vox , but the restrictions are just as insane, if much less amusing.

Females are allowed only one hundred words per day. The official language of American women is silence? And they will have to wear wrist-band counters that keep track.

Exceeding the daily quota results in a painful electrical shock. Run off at the mouth and the punishment becomes deadly.

Girls at school are given rewards for speaking the fewest words in a day. She is as shocked as most are by the imposition of outrageous strictures on her, and on all females.

Her husband, Patrick, is the science advisor to the president, surely a jokey position in a country where science is silenced and faith of a certain sort is given all the bullhorns.

But then Jean is approached by representatives of El Presidente. Her professional services are required. Jean negotiates a deal, and goes to work.

Complications ensue, not least is the presence on the research team of the incompetent rectum who stepped up to leadership when the women were kicked out, and someone from her past.

Will they be able to use their scientific super powers for the forces of good, or be bested by the forces of evil? Image from MissMuslim.

If millions of women marched in response to the election of Swamp Thing, I seriously doubt that a program like the one presented here would have been instituted as quickly as this one was, or at all.

Despite the excesses of our current administration, there are limits beyond which people actually would respond, and actively resist. But the point of the novel is not, clearly, to present a real potential future, but to highlight the importance of speech, of language in personal and political freedom, particularly for women.

Image from Betanews. Schools in Vox are made to offer AP Religious Studies classes that not only crowd out class time for Biology and History, but omit the comparative element of the study of religions in favor of promoting the religious track favored by those in charge.

So, propaganda. This is hardly a huge leap from school systems that insist on teaching that lovely oxymoron, creation science, alongside actual, reality-based, testable science, and pretending equivalence.

Similar to the approach of some news providers who seem to think that balance consists of offering equal time to truth-tellers and liars.

Call bullshit a rose often enough and weak-minded people will begin to enjoy the scent. Fake news? We live in a NewSpeakian world, so looking at the power of language, or words and how they are used and controlled offers considerable insight into the non-science-fiction reality we currently inhabit.

It is also of note how those words and notions are so often internalized. It seems the norm, sadly, for those in power to want to silence those who object, whatever their gender.

Colin Kaepernick knows, and I remember well the cries of Vietnam war supporters who regarded opposition as treason.

America, love it or leave it! Image from Yomyomf. The religious nuts running this show incorporate anti-gay bias into their new world order as well, making what they consider aberrant behavior a criminal act.

The chastity movement in the book is based on real-world insanity as well. She adds that there is a modern version of the Cult of Domesticity active in the US right now; the True Woman movement, part of a larger religious campaign called Revive Our Hearts.

There are plenty more, but these are the ones I have read. She is a theoretical linguist, with a strong concern with how language affects development.

What would women become after a few generations of bearing the yoke of silence? Is it ok to train your daughters to become, essentially, pets that double as sexual vessels?

The story moves along at a nice pace, making this a pretty fast read. It is engaging and stress-inducing, in a good way.

But I found the resolution even more unlikely than the underlying notion. If tight plotting is your thing, you will probably be disappointed.

But then this is not, IMHO, about the action-adventure element, as entertaining as that is. It is a warning about the cost of silence, and how not speaking up now can shut you up later, to the detriment, not only of yourself, but of generations to come.

Image from HappyGeek. Use your words. View all 67 comments. Aug 28, Deanna rated it it was amazing Shelves: arcs , , my-favorites. View all 65 comments.

Jun 10, Tammy rated it it was amazing. These days my country consists of states united in hate. At its helm is a man-child. A bully consumed by power, lacking intellect, as well as being morally and ethically deficient.

The severe subjugation of women by the angry, white, extremist Christian patriarchy is portrayed at its most monstrous.

A counter worn by women allows them to speak when spoken to and then only minimally. Once the allotted one hundred words per day ar These days my country consists of states united in hate.

Once the allotted one hundred words per day are spent, negative reinforcement is administered to the offending female in the form of a painful shock.

Other than these few words, women are not allowed any other form of communication: no email, snail mail, books, pens, or internet access.

And, nonverbal communication is not permitted which is monitored by surveillance cameras. This dystopian novel deftly handles politics of all stripes; gender, sexual, domestic and, to a lesser degree, racial and international.

Gone are the days of inclusion, tolerance and attempts at harmony. Oh wait! View all 99 comments. Apr 13, karen rated it liked it Shelves: from-publisher-or-author.

What do they study now, our girls? A bit of addition and subtraction, telling time, making change. Counting, of course. They would learn counting first.

All the way up to one hundred. View all 14 comments. An anti-women future you say? A future where the white man can have all the power he wants and the rest must, but must , comply or else?

Oh my God yes, sign me up for this shi 3. Even though Vox is a well-written and smart book, it was too outrageous and at times, it made me roll my eyes while reading it in public transport so hard that I thought they were going to roll back in my head and stay there forever.

I hated this sexist shit so much, but I still read the book. I was somehow waiting for something bomb to happen and everything to come back to at least a minimum of normal.

This is kind of a controversial book with a controversial topic and I will try to stay away from that as much as I can because I am not here to do politics or to play God.

I am here to pour on electronic paper my thoughts and feelings about the books I read and annoy the hell out of you with my long rant hehe.

Christina Dalcher created a not-so-hard-to-believe future, where the United States goes cuckoo and starts oppressing women as well as everyone who had a different point of view when it came to religion or sexuality.

Women in all the country wore some sort of torturing devices like bracelets on their wrists as well as young girls, no matter the age that only allowed them to speak one hundred words per day.

To be listened to. To be feared. I have nothing against men. I have nothing against church and religion. But I do have something against chronically sick maniacs who feel the need to share their twisted fantasies and fetishes with the world.

You cannot force people into submission endlessly. Fight against the system, fight against the purists and brain-washers, fight against her new status, fight against her own husband.

He complies. To stand for her. Someone who, like her, is not afraid to speak his mind. To fight for normalcy. Not approving of the whole having an affair kind of thing though.

I love the creepy medical path this whole book drives towards. I find medical stuff quite paralysing so this tickled my fascination.

This book was terrifying. And disturbing. And outrageous. But I truly appreciate its idea. Its very core.

It was kind of a fascinating read for me. Gripping sometimes. So, of course, I disliked it because of its very essence.

But of course, I liked it because of that very same essence. View all 11 comments. Aug 21, The Captain rated it did not like it Shelves: walk-the-plank.

Ahoy there me mateys! So here be me honest musings. So I seem to be in the minority again. This book irked me. The premise is that a misogynistic bunch of males has taken over the government and women have become second class citizens.

Restrictions include, but are not limited to- no jobs, no financial control, no access to books, no passports, and no real use of language.

It's the last limitation th Ahoy there me mateys! It's the last limitation that made me want to read this book. The statistic in the blurb claims that the is that the average person currently speaks 16, words a day.

In this book the woman can only speak words a day. To enforce this quota, all women are equipped with sensors around their wrists.

Go over the limit and ye get an electric shock. And it isn't mild. With every misbehavior, the force and duration of the punishments only increase.

The concepts behind limited women's speech were fascinating. In particular the relationship between the main character, Jean, and her youngest child, a girl, was the most poignant part of the novel.

The consequences for a generation of girls brought up without the skills of reading and the outlet of speaking were harrowing.

But unfortunately the expression of the novel's concepts and the impact of its message were completely filtered down by the awkward execution of this novel.

Some of the problems: - unlikable protagonist - Jean is supposed to be smart and intelligent. She holds a PhD and was about to make a major achievement in treating the problems of language malfunction in stroke patients.

And yet throughout the book she was whiny, unfocused, clueless, and meek. It made sense for the beginning of the novel but she never really became a strong force.

Subplots about animal testing that were unnecessary. Brand-new drugs working the first and only time on a human subject.

Multiple characters important to Jean that happen to be conveniently in a cell and rescued at a critical moment.

No cameras or recording devices in any place that seems rational. I am extremely liberal and yet this book seemed to be a political soapbox for hatred of the current regime.

I feel it would have had more force if set in slightly more distant future. And yet it lambastes any woman who doesn't follow a certain type of political activism.

It doesn't even seem to want women to have individuality of their own. Fie on any woman who wants to be a stay-at-home mom. Fie on any woman who doesn't attend political rallies and march the streets.

Fie on any woman that is a Christian. I do believe that all people should vote. But this seems to suggest if ye aren't a rabid fanatic about yer politics then ye are useless.

I get that a passive approach to horrible behavior can allow that behavior to flourish. Think the Nazis. But there are many different types of activism and legitimate lifestyles.

For a book to be about women power, a man is needed to bring down the regime. Then the main character runs to another country and doesn't even stay to help mitigate and direct the consequences of her actions.

She is basically a coward through and through. She is always being selfish and really never cared about the greater good. It's been compared to the Handmaid's Tale.

Skip this one and read that one instead. The Handmaid's Tale is a modern classic for a reason. So lastly. Thank you Berkley Publishing Group!

View all 25 comments. View all 13 comments. Oct 16, Felicia rated it it was ok. This is one of those books that's just blah for me.

The very definition of mediocre, from the storyline to the characters and beyond. There's really nothing that stands out, at least not in a positive way.

The author has somehow managed to take a unique plot line with limitless potential and turned it into a Christian and male bashing rant of epic proportions full disclosure: I am not a Christian nor am I a man.

The plot revolves around a dystopian future where U. Jean McClellan is among these women. Jean is a perpetually indecisive victim of her own circumstances.

She hates her husband. She hates her son. There's really nothing relatable or sympathetic about her character.

I could go on and on about the lack of character development but more importantly is the utter lack of development of the plot itself.

There is no lead up to, and even less explanation for, how women found themselves living this nightmare.

Other than a few references to a president that sounds strangely familiar, we're left with virtually no backstory. Overall this book is devoid of the tension and emotion that is mandatory for a dystopian book.

View all 44 comments. So much for the infallibility of Patrick. Well, I guess there are worse things than a wish for justice and an allergy to its counterpart, right?

At least to me it does. Other women. The ones who just wanna get out of the house and have some kind of identity. Does that make sense? Sure, you might say that people did and still do a lot of wrong things in the name of religion and to use it as a tool in order to create a dystopian world is nothing new.

I heard voices that said Dalcher is dragging Christianity in the mud and I heard voices that said it was a well-developed plot device… As for me?

Honest answer? I read 3 dystopian books this year and all of them had a religious motive. Of course they were, imagine how lovely your life could be if your mother had no way to reprimand you.

Poor Jean. To me it feels like there went a lot of energy into explaining the circumstances and the way life felt like for the MC and the other women in the book, but there was hardly any effort put into explaining how the men lived.

What they did, if they were okay with their women being silenced. If they struggled with this change too.

Throughout the entire book we just get one side of the coin and I still ask myself the question: Why did they even decide that the words of women should be counted?

To make them docile and obedient? Is that really the only motive? I have no clue where Dalcher wanted to go with this book, what the government actually planned to do or where the plot was supposed to head and this left me even more confused.

What for?! Only women or men as well? Why take such drastic measures? Anyway, prepare for salty comments and venomous curses in my updates!

View all 19 comments. Sep 22, Justin Tate rated it really liked it. This novel depicts a chilling dystopia, or as Mike Pence might call it: a visionary blue print for America.

The author does a great job of setting up the world with thinly veiled references to our current political climate.

Either figuratively or literally. After the initial se This novel depicts a chilling dystopia, or as Mike Pence might call it: a visionary blue print for America.

After the initial setup, the story transitions more into a typical race against time thriller. The premise is fantastic, but the espionage was cheesy and not particularly well written.

Overall: what probably started as a symbolic anti-Trump rant turned into surprisingly effective allegorical fiction. I wish the author had spent more time on the final third of the book, though, because it left a lot to be desired.

Still a solid, quick read that kept me turning the pages.

And then when finished I will just say the outcome Approaching The Unknown also a lot more satisfying this time around too leaving me to rate Vox at 4. Sep 22, Justin Tate rated it really liked it. I have been told that I missed the point, I am dense, I have Fallen – Engelsnacht respect from people, I think I am better than others, etc. Other than a few references to a president that sounds strangely familiar, we're left with virtually no backstory. I mentioned Winnetou Stream that I have tried my best to be a good person, a reasonable thinker, and a supportive friend Pink Cadillac all people I meet — so, should I be okay with it when a book attacks an South Park Staffel 21 Stream part of me and blames it for the potential downfall of society? November 8, Rather than document life during occupation as Margaret Atwood did so chillingly in The Handmaid's TaleVox quickly paces into a thriller, in which Reverend Carl offers Jean the chance to go back to work when the president's brother suffers brain trauma and needs to be cured. Hill Harper Trödeltrupp Sükrü Dr. Natürlich Silent House da die Vermutung nahe: Hier geht es ums Erbe! Ist Dr. Shaun gelingt es, Magenta 1 Tv Vorteil einer sehr verschlossenen Patientin Vertrauen aufzubauen und sie so letztendlich von einem wichtigen Eingriff zu überzeugen. Jared Kalu. Shaun wird immer mehr von Carly umworben. Jean Luc Bilodeau Freundin Murphy tritt seinen Dienst an. Ist er schon bereit? VOX. The Good Doctor. Serie, Dramaserie • • - Lesermeinung. Dr. Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore) und Dr. Carly Lever (​Jasika. Gute Nachrichten für Fans des talentierten Chirurgen. Die dritte Staffel von „The Good Doctor“ läuft endlich in Deutschland. The Good Doctor im Fernsehen - TV Programm: The Good Doctor. Heute, ​15 - , VOXTIPPNEUKrankenhausserie, USA , 55 summa11.eue Folge. Shaun Murphy. Neue Arztserie. Chuku Modu spielt Dr. Richard Griffiths. Dramatischer Auftakt des zweiteiligen Staffelfinales. Bewerten Sie die Serie:. Auch im Privatleben ist Shauns ganzer Mut gefragt. Shaun Murphy. Die erste OP unter seiner Leitung steht an. Hill Harper Kostenlos Und Legal Filme Gucken Dr.

It should be able to assume any form but somehow broke and got stuck on the police box. The TARDIS is larger on the inside than it appears to be on the outside, and it's the greatest vehicle known to man or alien.

He's also been played by other actors in other instances, but let's not wander too far into the weeds here. This was known as the Doctor's "regeneration.

Generally, the Doctor and a human companion at present, Jenna Coleman's Clara fly around the universe, having sci-fi adventures. Different writers on the show like different things, some enjoying epic science-fiction, with others liking to explore the show's roots as a children's educational program.

The Doctor was a time traveler so he could show kids earlier eras. Current showrunner Steven Moffat loves complicated puzzles, and his seasons have been filled with intricate structures that reveal themselves at the last possible moment.

Then the Doctor points his sonic screwdriver at something. Moffat loves the idea of the Doctor as the smartest, cleverest being who ever has lived, and his seasons of the show reflect that idea.

The puzzles can be fun, but his seasons can occasionally feel like he's pushing the characters around on a giant board to achieve his various ends.

Moffat's predecessor, Russell T. Davies , was fond of big, emotional gestures, and that meant he would conclude episodes or seasons with moments when, say, everybody resurrected the Doctor just by believing in him.

Every writer makes his or her mark on the show and the character, which only adds to the series' popularity. The endless malleability is part of the appeal.

It's definitely the sort of show that can be hard to explain without making it sound silly. Doctor Who started as a series for kids, and it has kept at least one toe in that world ever since.

What keeps the series from going too far over the top is that it always commits to what it's trying to do. It might be doing something unbelievably corny, but everybody involved really cares about the situations and characters on screen.

It helps that the Doctor is such an institution that every actor who plays the role brings prior associations with the character to their portrayal.

But the show also isn't hokey, ultimately, because it carries with it the ultimate blank canvas.

The potential for the show's setting is limitless, which is what makes it so enduring. Matt Smith's Eleventh Doctor center and his companions face down the Daleks in an earlier episode.

BBC America. Watching Capaldi yell at Daleks is a highlight of his tenure. Probably the most beloved Doctor — and certainly the longest-running — is Tom Baker, who played the Fourth Doctor and wore a fancy scarf.

But nearly every Doctor has his adherents. Since the series was revived in , all three actors who have regularly played the Doctor — Christopher Eccleston , David Tennant , and Matt Smith — have their fans.

Matt Smith left and David Tennant teamed up for the 50th anniversary special. No, and every new Doctor that's revealed to be a white dude prompts greater and greater irritation with this fact.

Moffat's a sterling storyteller, and his seasons have ingenious clockwork structures that the Doctor has to deduce. But this means that for the most part, his female characters usually the companions, but also River Song, a love interest for the Doctor are reduced from human beings who drive the story forward to plot devices the Doctor has to figure out.

Moffat writes superficially strong women, who have facility with a quip and are able to think their way out of sticky situations, but they also tend to be reduced to damsels in distress when it comes right down to it, and they react to hugely emotional situations — like, say, having their child taken from them — in largely unbelievable ways.

The question is whether this is specifically a problem with Moffat's writing for women or more a problem with his writing of characters who aren't the Doctor, and it would seem to skew more toward the latter.

For another, Moffat clearly just really loves the Doctor and seemingly would prefer to write only for him a lot of the time. We have audio tapes of them, which have been matched to production stills, but it's not the same, is it?

Can it happen here? ARC from Netgalley. View all 32 comments. Upon reading the premise of Vox, I knew it would have a place on my reading list because of its timeliness and the bravery of the author in taking on this fictional topic.

If you have not heard already, Vox is set in the United States at a time when a new president has been elected, and a mandate has been declared by the government: females may only speak w 4 thought-provoking and brave stars to Vox!

If you have not heard already, Vox is set in the United States at a time when a new president has been elected, and a mandate has been declared by the government: females may only speak words a day.

If they go over their allotment, they will receive an electric shock from a band installed on the arm. In a place founded on freedom, women and girls no longer have theirs.

Since women can no longer talk, they can no longer work. Girls are only taught math in school, and reading and writing is for boys only. The ramifications of this are overarching, and the author does an impeccable job delineating it all.

The main character, Dr. Jean McClellan, is a married mother of four children; however, only one of her children is a girl. How far will Jean go to demand a voice for her and her daughter?

Vox has a strong start. The writing is flawless, and the set-up of the premise feels completely authentic.

I was anxious at times wondering if something like could actually happen. The pacing was stronger in the first two-thirds, but I was invested in what was happening, terrifying as it was, so that did not keep me from reading on.

The ending was completely satisfying. I could see this as a movie, and I think it is a wonderful choice for book club discussions.

Now that I know more about what comprises a dystopian novel, Vox checks all the boxes. Thank you to Berkley for the physical ARC.

My reviews can also be found on my blog with my book pics! View all 43 comments. Sep 13, Lucy Langford rated it really liked it.

This is what has happened to America after an all-right christian fundamentalist group has taken over. Under the influence of a "pure" movement, women are fitted with "bracelets" that count how many words they speak in a day.

Women are allowed a maximum of words a day and are given severe consequences if they speak over this. They are not allowed to read, or to write or to sign.

This is a society where women are completely stripped of their rights to work, to speak out, and to their own autonomy. In addition, women who 'fornicate' with men outside of marriage and engage in pre-marital relations are first punished publicly These poor women are then sent to convents for hard labour and have their "bracelets" at zero words a day Dr Jean McClellan is a witness to all of this and experiences the harsh changes to society.

She herself, as an expert in neuro-linguistics, knows the importance of language in the development of children's brains. She witnesses how the "pure" movement was slowly introduced into schools, changing the way young people think and behave; she witnesses how her daughter barely speaks anymore in fear of the consequences.

She realises this needs to change, but without a voice, where can she begin? This book teaches the importance of using your voice, women's representation in government and society needing to be noticed, the need for equality across the board, otherwise, if voices aren't used, change can hardly happen.

This book offers a stark reality of what might happen without women's voices, without protest or discussion, or without those protesting on women's behalf The frightening part is how a society is easily brain washed into thinking the "pure" movement is the only truth and there can be no resistance or critique, something Dr Jean McClellan faces when she's afraid her own son might report her.

This novel was a completely compelling and unputdownable novel! It is disturbing and an uncomfortable read and will leave you thinking: What if?

It also questions the reader to evaluate themselves as to how they use their own voice I'm giving this 3. Also, while I really enjoyed the very scientific parts of the novel I've done modules on neuroscience, language and cognitive psychology so it was easy for me to follow and relish in this re-learning experience I can understand why this aspect may not be appealing to others as some parts were very science heavy.

If we must learn, let us ask our husbands in the closeness of the home, for it is shameful that a woman question God-ordained male leadership.

View all 22 comments. Aug 22, Felice Laverne rated it liked it Shelves: dystopian , full-review , women-s-fiction , read , netgalley , reviewed-on-amazon.

Somewhere along the line, what was known as the Bible Belt, that swath of Southern states where religion ruled, started expanding.

But the corset turned into a full bodysuit, eventually reaching all the way to Hawaii. And we never saw Somewhere along the line, what was known as the Bible Belt, that swath of Southern states where religion ruled, started expanding.

And we never saw it coming. Hmmm, what a concept. Some crossed the border into Canada; others left on boats for Cuba, Mexico, the islands.

The plot of Vox is simple. Who are trapped in America stripped of their jobs, their personal finances and their words. Once at the forefront of her field and on the verge of finding a cure for disease of the brain, she is now reduced to being confined within the four walls of her home, counting her words for the day and making dinner.

You need to be taught a lesson. It was as if Dalcher started out with a lofty idea but could not sustain it and, instead, resorted the love affairs and gorillas yes, gorillas to tell the story instead.

Lackluster is a more accurate one. The premise was enticing, the title is arresting, and the cover art is just enough — minimalist in a way that highlights the words snatched from these women.

There was an unexpected plot twist surrounding one of Dr. What I appreciated most about this novel were those few moments where Dalcher snuck in the truly disturbing and uncomfortable, mostly through moments between Jean and her six-year-old daughter, Sonia.

And our little Sonia lived up to that duty in several satisfying moments in Vox. The ending is a jumbled hot mess, a series of unlikely though convenient events.

I hate quickly summed-up bow-tie endings that feel rushed, like a six-year-old hurrying to tell mommy all about their day. To me, they are the ultimate cop-out and proof pudding of lack of true skill and finesse as a writer.

The Goodreads description of this book made me think Vox would take more time to explore and lay out the events around the breakdown of American society to the point that women become voxes.

For the most part, all of the deterioration of American society has already happened at the start of the book though we do get snippy interior commentary on it from Jean , and we follow her around watching her days as she copes with it.

Better luck next time. View all 20 comments. Aug 30, Jenny Reading Envy rated it it was ok Shelves: reviewcopy , ebooks , netgalley , read This one didn't really work for me, but I am giving it one more star than I feel to compensate for my current state of mind - I'm not really feeling into dystopia at the moment, and that isn't this book's fault.

I also haven't been able to stomach the second season of The Handmaid's Tale. It's interesting to me how many people are bailing or rating this low because the bad guys are Christians.

I'm seeing a lot of "not all Christians" rhetoric here. But to those people I would say, look around! W This one didn't really work for me, but I am giving it one more star than I feel to compensate for my current state of mind - I'm not really feeling into dystopia at the moment, and that isn't this book's fault.

Where are the Christians in the actual world, while citizens are denied passports , children are separated from their parents I don't even need a link for that one, votes of black people are overwhelmingly suppressed compared to other populations and there is a marked increase in hate crime?

Oh, that's not your fault, you say? Have you spoken up, have you done anything? See, that's the underlying premise of this novel, the part that I feel is most effective.

The main character is a scholar, aware of situations in the news, but not convinced she herself can or should do anything, and by the time she does it's too late.

And by then women's voices are literally being taken away. And those who claim to be Christians in power silence those who are in their same group, even if they wouldn't have been radical - they quickly get on board so as not to lose the upper hand.

This was far too familiar of a feeling. Being radicalized is not exclusive to one religion. If you're going to pull a notallchristians, double check your beliefs and actions against verses like James Another reason to keep this at an okay rating rather than lower.

It's obviously causing a reaction. There is a chilling moment which I can't quote exactly since I had an uncorrected proof, where the comment is made that the final decisions were made about taking voices away WHEN they started marching.

The rest of it felt too far-fetched to even work as a dystopian novel. Jean too easily goes back to her work when she is needed, doesn't seem to worry at all about surveillance, and doesn't seem to worry about the power her male children have, even after her son's girlfriend gets TAKEN AWAY for having sex with him.

We know from actual history China, Germany about children turning in their parents. I mean come on. And more disappointingly, that's not really how the characters suffer a downfall, so even if they would have been incredibly stupid to do those things, I would have felt the book was better if they had received consequences aligned with that stupidity I would understand that.

So while I engaged with this book as described above, it definitely wasn't what I would have hoped for. Thanks to the publisher for providing access to the title through NetGalley.

Instagram Twitter Facebook Amazon Pinterest I'm very upset about all the people who read this book and walked away thinking, "Not all Christians!

Not all men! I'm not saying that to be mean. I honestly believe that as a fact. History is full of people who have covered their ears when people say things that they don't want to listen to.

Look at all the Instagram Twitter Facebook Amazon Pinterest I'm very upset about all the people who read this book and walked away thinking, "Not all Christians!

Look at all the people who continue to furiously support Trump, despite the fact that he's proved time and time again that he is not only a bad politician, but also a bad human being, with his efforts to use his station to alienate our allies and twist the laws for his own personal gain.

It's a perversion of both justice and democracy, and yet the people who support him really seem to believe that they have the moral high ground.

How does this work? Is it that cognitive dissonance grows stronger as the evidence mounts, because it's easier to believe a lie than that you've made an egregious lapse in moral judgment?

I wonder. With VOX, Christina Dalcher explores a concept that has explored many times: what happens if a bunch of radical extremists seize control of a nation and oppress them with brutal savagery in the name of a greater good?

The heroine is a woman named Jean who used to be a neurologist, and now she is a housewife. She feels the rub of her imprisonment every day, from men who actively oppress her like the president , to men who passively and cowardly support the status quo like her husband , to men who embrace the new laws in blithe ignorance because it tells them what they want to hear like her son.

I have never wanted to punch as many people as I did while reading this book and actually had to step back for a week because it was making me so upset.

VOX starts out more strongly than it ends which I'll be getting to later , but the premise is a striking one: Christian fundamentalists have taken control of the country with something called the Pure Movement.

Men are the glory of God; and women are the glory of man, subservient and secondary in every way. Those in power have managed to achieve this by affixing counters to every woman's wrist that monitor how many words they speak a day.

The limit is , less than a Tweet, and speaking more than the limit delivers a painful electric shock that becomes more powerful with every word spoken past the limit, eventually becoming lethal.

This seems a little silly, the idea of a word counter that looks like a FitBit. But certain types of men are always trying to silence or discredit women.

Just last week, for example, I answered a question about science that someone asked, and one of the men reflexively said, "No, that's wrong!

Someone at the table looked up the answer, and, of course, I was right. Did this person apologize to me? They just shrugged, as if to say, "Well, even a broken clock is right at least twice a day.

The universe created in this novel doesn't really feel like such a stretch if you think of how many people in the world long for an idealistic version of the s when women weren't allowed to express themselves or push the boundaries of gender norms, and minorities were kept safely out of sight.

The second half of this novel deals with some interesting science. Interesting in the fact that it does kind of feel like one of those cheesy, less popular Michal Crichton novels, or a Dan Brown novel, in that you find yourself suspending more disbelief than you'd like while also pondering the realism of the literary equivalent of a cackling mad scientist looming against a lightning-strewn backdrop.

At the same time, there's a historical precedent of performing unspeakable medical practices against the oppressed, so this isn't as comfortably fantastical as some might like to believe, either.

And sometimes, taking the reductio ad absurdum approach works in literature because it forces us to realize that our reality is almost absurd as the satires that are created to rebuke it.

What does that say about us, I wonder? Reading VOX is almost guaranteed to upset the reader, but if you find yourself growing angry at the women - or the author - of the story, you should probably ask yourself why.

View all 24 comments. Apr 09, Mohammed Arabey rated it it was ok. But what if women were limited to just ?

May be it's just me who felt the pages novel annoyingly too long.. The idea is really great, but the writing style with overuse of unnecessary medical details, unbelievable coincidences, some flat characters or the lack of feeling them, presenting the Adultery as if it's fine for the main 'mother' And the too much of line and scenes that ends with expect that didn't happen or something like this..

That really made me disappointed.. The story has its scary moment of how men may behave about that, even the closest ones like sons.. Well, I needed this story, this strong crazy serious idea and plot to be in a story that much stronger and faster View 2 comments.

After sitting down with Vox it became immediately apparent to me that my feelings were going to be drastically different with this title. The stories are similar in the generalist of comparisons but Dalcher has brought the idea into this era in time to make it easier to relate to.

Vox opens introducing readers to Dr. Jean McClellan who has been downgraded from her status as a leading doctor in her field of study to nothing more than a housewife cooking and cleaning and caring for her four children.

With flashbacks into the past readers are given a look at how this world could have possibly come about where women are closely monitored and punished if they dare to speak more than words a day.

With a husband and three sons you easily see the comparison to how males are treated to how Jean and her young daughter are treated. Writing styles aside between these two books Vox still wins hands down as my favorite for giving a reader the hows and whys to the world peppered throughout the story.

As Vox goes on it really felt as if the author gave voice to the little questions that would plague me all the while weaving a tale that captured my attention and gained my sympathy to the character.

And then when finished I will just say the outcome was also a lot more satisfying this time around too leaving me to rate Vox at 4.

I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley. View all 9 comments. Apr 16, Trudi rated it it was ok Shelves: the-big-letdown , dystopia , arc , , netgalley , love-the-premise , twss.

Ah damn. I had such high hopes for this one. There's some good ideas contained therein, but none of them are really developed, and a lot of the themes just seem too heavy-handed and on the nose.

There is no subtlety, no allegory, the author is using an anvil Ah damn. There is no subtlety, no allegory, the author is using an anvil in heeding her warnings painting in big giant billboards -- do you SEE?

The book did get me to think about how all of humanity might be improved if everyone was limited to a hundred words a day. Because seriously, people are the worst and say the stupidest shittiest things non-stop.

A copy was provided through NetGalley for review. View all 3 comments. Jan 10, Susanne Strong rated it it was amazing Shelves: edelweiss , five-star-reads , buddy-read.

Powerful and Terrifying! Set in the United States, all women have been silenced. Their lives are completely restricted.

We are now only allowed to speak words per day. The limitation is controlled by counter on our wrists that will zap us every time we go over. For each infraction, the penalty is more severe.

No one is safe. Except the male gender, that is. We are no longer allowed to read books, use phones or send text messages and we are no longer able to work, thus ha 5 Astounding Stars!

We are no longer allowed to read books, use phones or send text messages and we are no longer able to work, thus half of the workforce has been cut.

Jean McClennan was a cognitive linguist in her former life. Now she is a housewife who wears a wrist counter. Obedient to her husband Patrick.

She has four children, one of whom is a daughter named Sonia who also wears a wrist counter and who speaks less than anyone. McClennan vows that someday, somehow, she will fight for her family and especially for her daughter.

Admittedly, it is horribly scary and at times, my heart caught in my throat and was beating so fast, I had to put the book aside and remind myself to breath.

Truthfully, I, for one, cannot imagine not being able to speak, send text messages or read! Some more than others of course - simply because some are so realistic and could actually happen - much more so than a horror story or a mystery.

Thanks for keeping me entertained throughout. This was a buddy read with Kaceey! So glad we finally got around to reading this.

Published on Edelweiss and Goodreads on 1. Jan 09, Elyse Walters rated it it was ok. Read by Julia Whelan. I heard some disturbing words about this novel That I took an intentional stand to skip it I seriously had no intention to read it as I say.

But between a conversation about this book with a friend over the phone AND Julia is great! Blaming Christians for controlling everything is ramped: one dimensional anger - bitterness - and resentment - just got old and annoying.

Tons of stereotyping! Too long! Rushed ridiculous ending! Read other reviews Shocking hyped story? I found it silly and often unkind View all 7 comments.

May 10, Heather rated it it was amazing. Soooo, women of the USA Just think about that for awhile. This book felt all too real to me as a woman.

I would like to see the reactions of some men. It had the same frightening realness for me that The Handmaid's Tale did, paired with references to recent past and current events.

I did not want to Soooo, women of the USA I did not want to put this book down. It was fascinating and - quite frankly - terrifying.

Thank you to Elisha Katz from Berkley Marketing for reaching out to me, offering the book for an honest review. I am so glad you picked my name out of the hat or whatever other magic got it into my hands.

And thank you so much to Christina Dalcher. I hope this book turns into the runaway hit I believe it deserves to be. You have written a very timely story, and I think it might be the prod needed to help some people make the choice to join the movement.

View all 12 comments. I looked at it as an escape from heavy historical fiction and thrillers. I was looking for a quick read that kept me interested and this book did just that.

There are many, many reviewers who are up in arms about comparisons to the current political climate, the naming of one religion, Christianity, as the culprit in this book.

So my review will be different than lots of others. From the blurb you know that society in the United States has gone back to the dark ages regarding women.

They no longer can hold a job, vote, travel, use a computer or read and they are limited by the counters on their wrists to words per day.

Supposedly this has been brought on by the political climate, the President himself and his followers. It is being called the Pure Movement, women belong in the home, raising children, cooking, cleaning, etc.

Female students will only be taught home ec type classes on how to manage a home and care for children, a little basic math is allowed, after all they have to measure those ingredients for recipes right?

Jean McClellan had been a renowned scientist studying and reaching linguistics. She and her team were on the cusp of a cure for aphasia which would help certain stroke victims and others find their words again.

I found the book entertaining. The pace is quick and the characters are interesting. What happens towards the end kept me reading until a.

I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss. Aug 21, Ron Charles rated it it was ok Shelves: apocalyptic.

Trump is never named in these pages, but the allusion is clear. The Pure Woman movement has hijacked the capital and the culture. American society has been wrenched back to a.

Nov 24, Joe Valdez rated it it was ok Shelves: sci-fi-general. My introduction to the fiction of Christina Dalcher is Vox. Published in , this was another novel that was almost nowhere on my reading docket, but I grabbed off the library shelf to pair with Golden State as the second half of a dystopian fiction bill.

I was ready to bail on it after 50 pages too due to many of the same factors--derivative story, uncompelling characters, atrocious dialogue, obnoxious prose--but I ended up skimming this one to the end.

It reminded me of a grade school recita My introduction to the fiction of Christina Dalcher is Vox. It reminded me of a grade school recital where the performance is fucking terrible but rather than flee for an exit, you stay seated because your child or some other little one you care about is up there.

The story is the first person account of forty-three year old Dr. Jean McClellan of suburban Maryland. Like all the women in the United States, she's been removed from the labor force, stripped of her civil rights and allotted words a day, which are monitored by a wristband that delivers electric current if girls or women exceed their quota.

Sign language is forbidden. Books other than the amended Bible are forbidden. Boys and men can speak or read all they want, of course, though they have little time to given the extra hours required to keep the economy running with a stricken work force.

Jean's husband Patrick is a science advisor to the new president, a young, ultra-right wing boob steered by the televangelist Reverend Carl Corbin.

Their sixteen year old son Steven is a Hitler youth type eating two scoops of the theology heaped upon high school boys of a kinder, gentler time where men and women were pure and knew their duties.

Their two year old daughter Sonia knows enough words to trigger the wrist monitor she wears but doesn't understand what will happen if she exceeds her quota.

Unable to communicate with other women like her political firebrand college friend Jacki, or her husband, Jean dreams of an escape from her domestic purgatory.

Patrick is the third type of man. He's not a believer and he's not a woman-hating asshole, he's just weak. And I'd rather think about men who aren't.

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But in the Santa Slay of [David] Shore, and with actors of the calibre of Richard Schiff, it somehow works. The New York Times press. The rest of it felt too far-fetched to even work as a dystopian novel. If your ideal of womanhood tends toward the Stepford-ishVox will present an image of paradise. I am here to pour on electronic paper my thoughts and feelings about the books I read and annoy the Severance Film out Reise Der Pinguine you with my long rant hehe. But to those people I would say, look around!

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